Du bruger en meget gammel browser. For en bedre oplevelse anbefaler vi at du bruger en nyere browsere.
City
01
nov
City

Blue-sky thinker, Rachel Armstrong, is a sustainability innovator. She investigates a new approach to building materials called ‘living architecture’, which suggests it is possible for our buildings to share some of the properties of living systems. Throughout her career, Rachel has championed the notion that buildings are an integral part of modern living and that our approach should reflect this. But how?

The metabolism of buildings

Throughout her career, Rachel has championed the notion that buildings are an integral part of modern living. More than designed ‘things’ they are living organisms that shape and mould human existence and our approach should reflect this; paralysis in innovation is caused by our own limited thinking. Rachel advocates that to improve sustainability we should connect our buildings to nature, not cut them off from it. But what does it mean to design for an unpredictable world? Solutions and ideas are out there. How do we uncover them? And what happens when a city starts to grow the same way nature does?

Rachel Armstrong is a sustainability innovator who investigates a new approach to building materials called ‘living architecture,’ which suggests it is possible for our buildings to share some of the properties of living systems. She collaboratively works across disciplines to build and develop prototypes that embody her approach and has exhibited at internationally renowned festivals such as the Venice Biennale (2010, 2015). She also consults with industry to advise on convergent technologies and low carbon solutions and holds a position of Professor of Experimental Architecture at Newcastle University.

Rachel was a member of the RESCUE “”Collaboration between the natural, social and human sciences in global change research”” Working Group, an interdisciplinary body of European experts making recommendations to the EU for strategic investment for interdisciplinary/scientific research of climate change.